Working from home has become the new normal in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, and more of us are using social media even more frequently than before. Social media continues to allow us to connect with friends and family, keep up to date with current events, and market our businesses. In an earlier post, I discussed a social media roadmap for attorneys, which outlined the basics of getting involved in social media from a professional perspective.  

Now that you have chosen your social media platforms and target audience, you may be wondering what you should and should not post and even when and how to do so. The following tips will give you some guidance in getting started.

Know The Rules About What To Post  

While most social media sites have a relaxed vibe making it easy to share your thoughts with a quick click of a button, make sure you understand the rules and restrictions about what you can and cannot post as an attorney before posting. Rules regarding what constitutes attorney advertising can vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction as well as ethical concerns that must be considered and understood before hitting send. 

Avoid writing about specific issues and cases in which you are involved because you may inadvertently violate attorney/client confidentiality. In addition to general rules and restrictions, your law firm may have its own policy about using social media. 

Share What You Know And What You Want Others To Learn 

Most of us have an elevator speech memorized – a five-minute dialogue about who we are and what we do. Social media is a good place to broaden that speech. Let your followers know what you do and who you are, and feel free to share content that supports that. If you write a blog, share your posts. If you’re giving a presentation, share details about where and when it will take place and what it’s about.  

If you have a new achievement, it is ok to share it with your followers. They will be happy to applaud you. Interesting information in the form of articles or posts from your friends and colleagues can also be shared. You don’t have to feel that you must constantly create new content. Think about your audience and what information would be useful for them to know.

Do Unto Others  

The old adage applies here. Be sure to give appropriate shout outs or “likes” to others, and they may very well do the same for you. This does not mean that you have to spend the day “liking” posts for no reason, but if some information appeals to you or a colleague is touting a new accomplishment, give them some positive feedback or thoughtful comment. This is another way to stay relevant on social media and actively engage with others. 

If you have cultivated a network of meaningful contacts, you can use social media to further professional relationships. A well-maintained profile can give potential clients an idea of what it would be like to work with you. You can also encourage past clients to leave a review on your business page. In a time when we are all working from home, it also may be the best opportunity for you to network and connect. Reaching out through social media is a great way to stay in touch.

Set Aside Some Time To Post 

Set aside time each day, each week, or even each month, to thoughtfully formulate what you will post. You might find it useful to create a simple calendar notification reminding you which days to post. One of the benefits of social media is the ease of use, but it can also be a downfall. Think about what you want to say before you say it, as you cannot take it back once it is said.

When used thoughtfully and responsibly, social media is an excellent tool for staying relevant and connected with others, especially in times like this, when we must be physically apart.