Virtually every business that exists today has some form of online presence, and that likely includes reviews. Restaurants, clothing stores, even law firms like yours depend on reviews. So what happens if you get a negative one? Or multiple negative ones? In our September 26 webinar, we talked with a panel of experts about how these negative reviews can help your business. Here are some of the key points:

The first point made by a product manager at Martindale-Hubbell, Brian Veeder, is that “people […] generally realize that any business is going to have negative reviews.” No matter what line of work you’re in, there’s no escaping the occasional mistake or error that leads to a negative client experience. Prospective clients will trust reviews if they believe they’re authentic, and that’s judged by the firm having a mix of good and bad reviews that account for the less positive experiences. 

Another point made during the webinar was that negative reviews about an attorney’s style could be a positive for some. For example, a client may leave a negative review saying that their attorney was tough and aggressive. While some may not be looking for that in a lawyer, others may be searching for that exact type of tenacity. 

Patrick Palace, owner of and attorney at Palace Law Firm, also discussed his experience with negative online reviews, saying:

“How cool is it to have an army of people out there beta testing my product and telling me what they need to make it even better? And you know what? All of these people are absolutely free. So, bad review? That’s okay, it’s just another chance for me to get it right.”

When you look at negative reviews as a way of improving your product without having to gather focus groups or spend a dime, it becomes clear that they can be a useful tool. You can improve your firm and make it less likely to receive the same negative review again.

To watch the full webinar about the different ways negative reviews could be a useful tool for your firm, click here.

WATCH THE WEBINAR HERE